Chariots of Fire

Winner of 4 Academy Awards including Best Picture, this masterpiece showed how this very famous song was created, as it showed how the Olympics can be when you train hard. This is famous throughout these years, as it can show everything. The Olympics, this song and how great this movie is.

From 1919 to 1924, Olympic runners compete, in the worldwide 1924 Olympic Games in Paris, France. This is a true story when this did, on these runners that ever lived. After training hard for four years, and running hard, comes the biggest event in Olympic history.

There were two running athletes competing together in those games. Eric Liddell played by Ian Charleston, and Harold Abrahams played by Ben Cross. Going for the gold. On that medal. There were runners also from Britain going for the games.

What made this movie famous, was the song of course, but the opening and ending scene of this movie. How all five runners, were running on the beach with runners also. Going from the end of the beach to the small hotel close by in a town not far. As a boy and a father watched them go, their dog was cheeky as it tried to catch them. The way you look at them doing that, it’s the most famous scene in film and Olympic history.

That scene was used and edited, in the 2012 Summer Olympics, on the final segment of the opening scene to the summer Olympics. From the London Symphony Orchestra, Rowan Atkinson was playing the piano and daydreaming on that beach in that famous movie. Where he was running and how he won. No wonder this was famous throughout history.

After a famous victory, it had a great ending as we shall never forget this movie, this song, and the famous run on the beach while they play the music. Along with Ben Cross and Ian Charleston are Nicholas Farrell, Nigel Havers, Daniel Gerroll, Ian Holm, and Richard Griffiths. Such legends in this classic. And I am proud of them.

I am very proud of this all time classic, that I give 10/10 stars on this masterpiece. “Chariots of Fire”.

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